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Remember when Pharrell wore Smokey’s hat to the 2014 Grammys? At this year’s Shorty Awards, Smokey Bear took Silver for real-time content marketing.

Also, AT&T’s It Can Wait anti-texting and driving campaign that we built the site for working with Omelet received honorable mentions in best multi-platform, best social good campaign and best use of a hashtag.

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As the community managers for Smokey Bear for over 4 years, we’ve helped grow his social media following to over 300,000 Facebook friends and helped him expand his footprint to multiple social networks. In that time we’ve also seen that his fans are always looking for new ways to spread his wildfire prevention message.

HelpGood is proud to announce the release of Smokey’s first-ever digital book, “Smokey Bear and the Campfire Kids.” We developed the app as our first foray into social good products that entertain while doing good. A portion of all proceeds goes back into the Smokey Bear education campaign.

As content marketers, we know that storytelling is a valuable tool in creating awareness. We designed this book to help move Smokey’s wildfire prevention message forward and to deepen his relationship with his biggest fans.

Smokey Bear and the Campfire Kids is being released on the heels of Smokey’s 70th Birthday, his induction into the Advertising Week Walk of Fame and in support of Fire Prevention Week (Oct. 5-11). It is the first in a planned four-book series of Smokey Bear Apps featuring Smokey and his enduring “Only You Can Prevent Wildfires” prevention message. The book features illustrations and animation by the Emmy-winning Animax and continues in the tradition of Little Golden Books’ Smokey stories his fans fondly remember.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smokey and Pharell

 

When real-time marketers post up in front of the TV on an award season Sunday night, they may have a list of pre-written tweets and scenarios bouncing around in their minds to tie-in to their brands and campaigns. However, once you start planning you start to chip away at the magic — the Blackout Oreo Magic that we all hope for and can never see coming.

All you can really do is fire-up the Photoshop and track the conversation so you’re ready just in case the biggest music producer in the world wears a hat that looks like the hat of the bear you tweet for.

The 2014 Grammys and Pharrell Williams gave Smokey Bear a gift and HelpGood was ready to accept it, amplify it and make sure the whole world received that gift too — along with important wildfire prevention messages, of course. We generated images immediately featuring Smokey and Pharrell and jumped into the conversation.

When I say magic, this is what I mean:

Within 24 hours, Smokey’s Twitter followers grew by almost 25 percent. Organic search traffic to our campaign website, SmokeyBear.com, increased by 123 percent. In total, there were more than 36,000 tweets about Smokey, resulting in more than 58.5 million impressions.

Almost immediately, the press began including Smokey in the night’s round-ups. By the next morning, more than 180 media outlets were talking about Smokey, including The Today ShowCNNBuzzfeedLos Angeles TimesNew York PostWall Street JournalNew York magazineNew York Daily NewsElleDaily BeastHuffington PostAdweekNPR, PeopleExtra TV and USA Today.

3 things to note here:
1) This is a social good, government campaign that surpassed the big brands to “win the night.”
2) The fact that our client completely trusted us and gave us the authority to publish without approval was essential. (A trust built over 3 years).
3) We had no extra budget for this, it’s apart of our standard community management fees. The ROI was unreal.

If you want even more great information on the story of Smokey Bear and the Grammys, read Meg Rushton’s post that includes tips on real-time marketing on Ad Council’s blog for social marketers.

Happy Holidays from HelpGood

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You Can Haz Meme

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HelpGood’s Michael Bellavia contributed a post to the Ad Council’s Adlibbing blog regarding memes and how to leverage them. In particular the post talks to how the Smokey Bear campaign has made use of memes to connect with a younger audience and spread his wildfire prevention message.

June 2012 marks the two year anniversary with Smokey Bear and HelpGood. We’ve come a long way in helping push Smokey’s wildfire prevention message.

HelpGood has deployed multiple social media marketing tactics and created new content to support the campaign.  We have created original apps for the web and mobile devices, as well as imagery, articles, and more.

When HelGood first started working with Smokey Bear back in June 2010, he was just getting his feet wet in social media.  Two years later HelpGood has helped Smokey see some big results:

  • Facebook likes grew by almost 250%, currently over 62,000
  • Twitter likes grew by over 500%, nearly 11,000
  • His YouTube channel gets 500% more views per year than it did in 2010
  • The official website is now getting almost 400% more views per year than it did in 2010

Overall we have had a really wonderful time with this campaign and hope to push Smokey’s message to the furthest reaches of the universe!

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A stuffed Smokey Bear will be spending 4 months in space with NASA astronaut Joe Acaba and crew.  Given to Joe as a gift from his friend who works for the U.S. Forest Service, Smokey will be able to spread his message all the way into zero-gravity.  He will even be celebrating his 68th birthday out in orbit.

Read the full article here.

Brand mascots became popular in 1950s with TV advertising and are coming back stronger than ever, through social media.  Even the Ad Council has been utilizing mascots through social media.  Currently Smokey Bear is the face and voice of his own Facebook and Twitter pages.

“Today, social media is giving marketers a whole new playground to test and nurture mascots. “I think the web is going to [bring] a heyday for creating new characters and stories,” Carol Phillips, president of consulting group Brand Amplitude said.”  Read the full article here.

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